Independent agents are independent contractors for the insurance companies they represent. Several companies may authorize the agent to sell for them, but the agent remains an independent businessperson. While the agent collects commissions, they do not collect a salary from the companies they represent. On average, independent agents work with thirteen property and casualty and six life and health insurance companies on a regular basis.[7]
There are at least two questions that insureds should ask upon receiving a letter denying coverage for a claim or learning of the absence of a particular type of coverage that would have otherwise covered the claim: (1) Was the insurer’s denial of coverage supported by the terms and conditions of the policy?; and (2) Is my broker liable for the damages resulting from the absence of coverage? Answering the first question in the affirmative does not necessarily mean a “yes” answer to the second question. There are certain circumstances under New York law in which an insurance agent or broker can be potentially liable for failing to procure coverage on behalf of its insured.
To sell insurance products on behalf of a particular insurer, an agency must have an appointment with that insurer. An appointment is a contractual agreement that outlines the specific products the agency may sell. It also specifies the commissions the insurer will pay for each product. The contract usually describes the agency's binding authority, meaning its authority to initiate a policy on the insurer’s behalf. The agent may have permission to bind some types of coverage but not others.

Someone Who Sells Insurance


To sell insurance products on behalf of a particular insurer, an agency must have an appointment with that insurer. An appointment is a contractual agreement that outlines the specific products the agency may sell. It also specifies the commissions the insurer will pay for each product. The contract usually describes the agency's binding authority, meaning its authority to initiate a policy on the insurer’s behalf. The agent may have permission to bind some types of coverage but not others.

How To Buy Insurance

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